Steve Grunwell

Open-source contributor, speaker, and coffee snob

Tag: Git

Quick-tip: git add –patch

If you’ve ever found yourself in a situation where you’re working on multiple code changes at once and want to split them across multiple Git commits (or simply not commit parts of it), git add -p will let you interactively specify separate parts of the file to be committed.

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Keeping WordPress Under [Version] Control at WordCamp Grand Rapids

Learn how to keep your WordPress sites under version control using a git workflow refined over dozens of sites. We’ll cover repository organization, what belongs (and, perhaps more importantly, what doesn’t belong), and how to make deploying updates and working with multiple environments as painless as possible.

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php[world] 2014

I’ll be giving two talks at the inaugural php[world] conference, organized by the php[architect] team this fall in Washington, D.C. I’m humbled to be speaking alongside a bunch of great developers, including WordPress Lead Developer Andrew Nacin and Taylor Otwell, the creator of Laravel.

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Keeping WordPress Under [Version] Control at WordCamp North Canton

Learn how to keep your WordPress sites under version control using a git workflow refined over dozens of sites. We’ll cover repository organization, what belongs (and, perhaps more importantly, what doesn’t belong), and how to make deploying updates and working with multiple environments as painless as possible.

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Keeping WordPress Under [Version] Control at WordCamp Columbus

Learn how to keep your WordPress sites under version control using a git workflow refined over dozens of sites. We’ll cover repository organization, what belongs (and, perhaps more importantly, what doesn’t belong), and how to make deploying updates and working with multiple environments as painless as possible.

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Speaking at WordCamp Columbus 2013

For those of you in or around Central Ohio August 2-3 I’ll be presenting a talk based on “Keeping WordPress Under [Version] Control” at WordCamp Columbus 2013 in the Ohio Union at The Ohio State University. There’s a great line-up of speakers including Pippin Williamson (Pippin’s Plugins) and Samuel “Otto” Wood (if you’ve been developing with WordPress for any amount of time you’ve almost certainly read his blog).

The conference is trying something new this year and dedicating the entire first day (Friday, August 2) to a day-long WordPress beginners’ course with the second day (Saturday, August 3) focused more on WordPress awesomeness. If you work for a company that uses WordPress (as a client or as a vendor) now’s the time to beg your boss to send a group of WordPress newbies to WordCamp – learn how to use the world’s most popular content management system and get out of the office on a Friday in August? That’s one helluva deal for just $40!

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Keeping WordPress Under [Version] Control with Git

Over the last year or so I’ve been deploying my sites and applications almost exclusively through Git. It took a while to get used to, but pushing all of my code through git has forced me to think through my code before committing (lest I get git blame’d), kept me concentrated on the task at hand, and has made collaborating with other developers so much easier. Deploying WordPress sites through Git require a little configuration; this article outlines my personal Wordpress-Git workflow.

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Using Git Checksums to Invalidate Browser Caches

I’ve been having a lot of fun with the new, open-source version of this site and have been looking for opportunities to experiment with things I’d have little reason to do on client sites. For instance, I wanted to see if I could get the current git checksum as a string using PHP (without resorting to shell commands) so that I could display it in the comments of my WordPress template. Once I was able to achieve that, I took it one step further and used it to invalidate browsers’ cached versions of my scripts and styles anytime I made an update to the theme.

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