I’m a full-stack developer with a passion for coding clean, semantic, and functional websites and applications. I do a lot of PHP, I dabble in Rails, and I enjoy using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to build slick, modern interfaces. By day, I’m working as a Senior Software Engineer at Liquid Web.

Over the past few years, I’ve developed quite a fondness for WordPress, the platform on which this site is built (You can view the source of this site over on GitHub). You may have come across one of my WordPress plugins, WP Password Generator or WP Client Reference, both of which are available through the WordPress plugin repository.

Latest Blog Posts

Routing phone calls to volunteers with Twilio

In the past week or so, I’ve been working on a Laravel application that enables groups of volunteers to be added to a call tree; a phone number comes in, then gets routed to one of the active volunteers’ phone. A lot of the core functionality is there, but the app isn’t quite ready to release to the general public. There’s something of a time-crunch, however, as the main reason for building the application is to connect people who need rides to their polling places with volunteers in the days leading up to the critical 2018 midterm elections.

Here’s the concept: someone in need of a ride calls a Twilio number, which then rings up to ten (10) volunteers’ phones. Whomever picks up first gets the call, and they can work through arranging transportation.

Building the application has been an awesome introduction to telephony service providers like Twilio, which combine voice and SMS messaging with web applications. Using Twilio’s TwiML (Twilio Markup Language), I can write simple XML documents to describe how to respond to different messages. I have a lot of features planned as far as routing calls more intelligently and letting volunteers mark themselves as unavailable, but I wanted to get the bare-bones TwiML out to the public as far ahead of Election Day as possible.

Understanding the functions.php file in WordPress

AIf you’re just getting started with WordPress, there’s likely a lot of new terminology being thrown at you. Beyond fundamentals like “themes” and “plugins”, you’re probably seeing “actions”, “filters”, and a ton of code snippets with instructions like “just add this snippet to your functions.php file.”

Let’s take a step back and look at WordPress’ functions.php file; what it is, where it lives, and how it works. Once we understand those points, we’ll learn how to add snippets to our WordPress sites without having them accidentally overwritten.

Using user-customizations.sh in Laravel Homestead

Today, Laravel Homestead maintainer Joe Ferguson tagged version 7.16.0 of the Laravel Homestead library. The announcement tweet includes “Adds support for user-customizations.sh” which, probably doesn’t mean much to anyone who hasn’t followed Pull Request #932 over the last few days. As the person who opened that particular PR, I figured it might be nice to document the motivations.

Get your geeky fill on my blog!