Steve Grunwell

Open-source contributor, speaker, and coffee snob

Tag: Laravel Homestead

Stacks of vintage, sepia-toned photographs

Paid Support for Legacy Libraries

A few weeks ago, I was talking to my good friend Eric Mann about an open-source package he maintains. This particular package has quite a number of downloads and active users, despite Eric trying to abandon it a few years ago. He’s since restarted development on it, but now he faces a problem: people are upset that he’s dropped legacy PHP version support.

This particular package is popular within the WordPress ecosystem, which is big on backwards compatibility. Despite the fact that both PHP 5.6 and 7.0 stopped receiving even security updates at the end of 2018, there are still plenty of users out there running their applications in old, insecure versions of PHP. As a result, some people were rather upset when Eric stated “I’m not going to spend my [limited] time supporting EOL’d versions of PHP.”

Some commenters were quick to jump in with remarks ranging from “well, it doesn’t take that much time to support older versions of PHP…” to “WordPress supports older versions of PHP, so should you!”, but Eric remained firm: if you want support for older versions of PHP, you can either pay me for my time or contribute the code yourself.

It may sound a little harsh, but I’m 100% with Eric on this one: he doesn’t owe anybody his time and effort. That’s time he could be spending with his family, out hiking, or working on projects that he enjoys. Heck, knowing what Eric can do, back-porting support for old versions of PHP should be way down on his list of priorities.

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A home sitting on a midwestern, prairie homestead.

Simplify Project On-boarding with Laravel Homestead

Despite working on Liquid Web’s Managed WordPress and Managed WooCommerce hosting products, a fair amount of the development work I do these days has very little to do with WordPress. In fact, my main project right now is using Laravel, and it’s the sixth Laravel application (depending on how you count projects) I’ve worked on in just under two years at the company.

Laravel’s an incredibly powerful application framework with a thriving ecosystem. Thanks to tools like Composer and Packagist, I have access to thousands of libraries, extensions, and utilities to help me build the best applications possible. Even out of the box, the framework has support for (among many other things) multiple database and caching engines, event-driven architecture, and websockets, giving me a strong foundation for building modern web applications.

Of course, incorporating multiple platforms and tools into a single application can make on-boarding new team members more difficult. How do you make sure they’re running the right versions of PHP, your RDBMS of choice, Redis, and more?

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A home sitting on a midwestern, prairie homestead.

Using user-customizations.sh in Laravel Homestead

Today, Laravel Homestead maintainer Joe Ferguson tagged version 7.16.0 of the Laravel Homestead library. The announcement tweet includes “Adds support for user-customizations.sh” which, probably doesn’t mean much to anyone who hasn’t followed Pull Request #932 over the last few days. As the person who opened that particular PR, I figured it might be nice to document the motivations.

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A home sitting on a midwestern, prairie homestead.

Developer-specific Laravel Homestead Configurations

Since joining Liquid Web, I’ve gotten to revisit Laravel, my favorite application framework for PHP. I’m still doing plenty of WordPress work, of course, but when building web applications — especially those with robust APIs — building atop Laravel makes so much more sense than shoehorning it into a WordPress environment.

In their mission to make application development delightful, Taylor Otwell and the other Laravel developers (including my friend Joe Ferguson) maintain Laravel Homestead, a pre-packaged Vagrant box for Laravel development. While the environment can be installed globally, Laravel Homestead can also be installed on a per-project basis, ensuring each application has its own, dedicated virtual machine.

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